Creative Writing Club Activities

Creative Writing Club Activities-51
The following activity is great fun, and usually produces great results, but must be used with caution.Only try it with a class you are comfortable with, and who you think will cope with the situation. , and five minutes after explaining the assignment, "Finished!

The following activity is great fun, and usually produces great results, but must be used with caution.Only try it with a class you are comfortable with, and who you think will cope with the situation. , and five minutes after explaining the assignment, "Finished!

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They don't need to have read the book which is being advertised, and you can get them to compare their own story to the real version when they have finished.

Take 4 or 5 unrelated but interesting objects and challenge children to create either a skit or a character description of the owner.

Whether you're a you're sure to find a wealth of practical, tested ideas that excite and encourage your students to become skilled communicators through creative writing.

Trust me, you know you're doing something right, when you hear, "Oh, boy!

Remind the children of the story and read chapter 15 - a description of the Chocolate Room.

Ask the children who have read the story if they can think of any of the other rooms in the factory.Ask the children to think of a story that they know well, and to write another version from another point of view. Write "Cinderella" from the point of view of one of the ugly sisters, OR Write "The Three Billy Goats Gruff" from the point of view of the troll, OR Write "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" from the point of view of Goldilocks.Based on "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" by Roald Dahl.Let each child take the mascot (and a book in which to write) home for a few days at a time.While they are looking after the mascot, they should write a short story in the book outlining what the mascot has done during its stay with them. When the mascot returns to school, spend some time discussing what it has done and where it has been. A good way of asking children to use their descriptive writing skills is to ask them to invent a new animal.Great for oral discussion but also useful for character analysis. If you’re a high school student interested in creative writing, you may or may not have a number of broad extracurricular options to pursue during the school year, depending on your school.In the back of many books, there are often adverts for other stories.Why not get the children to choose one of these adverts, and write a story based on the description of the story in the advert.Are they secretly composing their own illustrated chapter books "just for the fun of it"? Select topics and prompts that expand across all genres, from memoir to mystery, fantasy to fiction, poetry to prose.Have groups of students formed clubs whose members pen and edit stories together at the lunch table and on the playground? Browse ideas and hands-on activities that jump-start skills across the curriculum. Check back often for the newest ideas, or to add your own!

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