Elie Wiesel'S Thesis

Elie Wiesel'S Thesis-3
However, when they start to analyze their life, it becomes obvious, what losses they suffered.“From the depths of the mirror, a corpse gazed back at me.He understood the consequences of horrible events he experienced.

However, when they start to analyze their life, it becomes obvious, what losses they suffered.“From the depths of the mirror, a corpse gazed back at me.He understood the consequences of horrible events he experienced.

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Without saying it to him, I thought I was the last of our line. The moment the war ended, I believed — we all did — that anyone who survived death must bear witness.

I believed — I hoped — that I would not survive him, not even for one day.

I would like to point out that such ignorance can be explained by the fact that Seidman mostly supports word choice. (1995) says that “anyone who comes in contact with these horrors will be forever shaken in his present faith” (1).

She “neglects features of structure such as the inclusion of novelistic devices that shed light on Wiesel’s motives” (Flynn 2). According to the popular website (2005) the main hero “finally despairs of both God and humanity, yet juxtaposed against the atrocities is the story of his enduring relationship with his father” (1).

And of course I am afraid that memories suppressed could come back with a fury, which is dangerous to all human beings, not only to those who directly were participants but to people everywhere, to the world, for everyone.

So, therefore, those memories that are discarded, shamed, somehow they may come back in different ways, disguised, perhaps seeking another outlet. But information must be transformed into knowledge, knowledge into sensitivity, and sensitivity into commitment.During World War II, Elie Wiesel’s parents and a sister were killed in Nazi death camps, and he was imprisoned at Buchenwald. Some of us even believed that they survived in order to become witnesses.In later years, the Nobel laureate came to believe it was his job to share his memories of the horrors he experienced. But then I knew deep down that it would be impossible to communicate the entire story. I personally decided to wait, to see during ten years if I would be capable to find the proper words, the proper pace, the proper melody, or maybe even the proper silence to describe the ineffable.The most interesting point is that there are two in the book.On the one hand, the readers are familiar with an innocent child; on the other hand, they see the hero, who is destroyed with his horrific experience. It is difficult to believe that the boy was changed so much.The second Eliezer won’t accept another side of his soul anymore.Jennifer Flynn says that Naomi Seidman, “professor of Jewish Culture at Berkeley College’s Graduate Theological Union ignores critical aspects of the autobiographical genre and Wiesel’s transformation of that form that valuably complicate an understanding of ” (1).Looking at the new image of the main hero the author provides us with, we understand that Eliezer’s viewpoints have been altered.As far as the boy has no parents, nobody can state that he is somebody’s child.I believe that the witnesses, especially the survivors, have the most important role.They can simply say, in the words of the prophet, “I was there.” What is a witness if not someone who has a tale to tell and lives only with one haunting desire: to tell it. Without memory, there would be no civilization, no society, no future. As a teenager, Elie Wiesel was imprisoned in Nazi concentration camps for 11 months.

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