Thesis Statements American Dream Great Gatsby

Thesis Statements American Dream Great Gatsby-90
And as we mentioned above, the 1920s were a particularly tense time in America.We also meet George and Myrtle Wilson in Chapter 2, both working class people who are working to improve their lot in life, George through his work, and Myrtle through her affair with Tom Buchanan.

And as we mentioned above, the 1920s were a particularly tense time in America.We also meet George and Myrtle Wilson in Chapter 2, both working class people who are working to improve their lot in life, George through his work, and Myrtle through her affair with Tom Buchanan.

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As we crossed Blackwell's Island a limousine passed us, driven by a white chauffeur, in which sat three modish Negroes, two bucks and a girl.

I laughed aloud as the yolks of their eyeballs rolled toward us in haughty rivalry. ." Even Gatsby could happen, without any particular wonder.

is a tragic love story on the surface, but it's most commonly understood as a pessimistic critique of the American Dream.

In the novel, Jay Gatsby overcomes his poor past to gain an incredible amount of money and a limited amount of social cache in 1920s NYC, only to be rejected by the "old money" crowd.

Chapter 1 places us in a particular year—1922—and gives us some background about WWI.

This is relevant, since the 1920s is presented as a time of hollow decadence among the wealthy, as evidenced especially by the parties in Chapters 2 and 3.The 1920s in particular was a pretty tumultuous time due to increased immigration (and the accompanying xenophobia), changing women's roles (spurred by the right to vote, which was won in 1919), and extraordinary income inequality.The country was also in the midst of an economic boom, which fueled the belief that anyone could "strike it rich" on Wall Street.In any case, the novel, just by being set in the 1920s, is unlikely to present an optimistic view of the American Dream, or at least a version of the dream that's inclusive to all genders, ethnicities, and incomes.With that background in mind, let's jump into the plot!You can read a detailed analysis of these last lines in our summary of the novel's ending.But I didn't call to him for he gave a sudden intimation that he was content to be alone--he stretched out his arms toward the dark water in a curious way, and far as I was from him I could have sworn he was trembling.(He did work hard and honestly under Dan Cody, but lost Dan Cody's inheritance to his ex-wife.) In short, things do not turn out well for our dreamers in the novel!Thus, the novel ends with Nick's sad meditation on the lost promise of the American Dream.However, in Chapters 7 and 8, everything comes crashing down: Daisy refuses to leave Tom, Myrtle is killed, and George breaks down and kills Gatsby and then himself, leaving all of the "strivers" dead and the old money crowd safe.Furthermore, we learn in those last chapters that Gatsby didn't even achieve all his wealth through hard work, like the American Dream would stipulate—instead, he earned his money through crime.

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